Planning & Institutional Effectiveness

Strategic Plan 2014-2019

Strategic Plan 2014-2019  (pdf)

Strategic Plan Progress and Evaluation

 

  • Goal #1 Increase equitable student engagement, learning, and success
     
    Objectives Strategies
    1.1. Improve equity in student success outcomes.

    A. Develop customized, evidence-based methods and performance goals to support the achievement of all students.

    B. Develop, scale, and institutionalize sustainable, innovative, and evidence-based practices that increase student completion within all demographic and socio-economic groups.

    C. Provide opportunities for professional learning aimed at increasing the retention and success rates of all students.

    1.2. Increase the number of students who: complete courses, certificates, and degrees; are prepared for transfer and career opportunities; and enter or advance within the workforce.

    A. Improve completion of basic skills sequences for all students to enhance overall certificate and degree completions.

    B. Ensure programs and learning outcomes align with transfer requirements and employers.

    C. Expand external job/career placement services on campus.

    D. Offer robust distance education programs with clear pathways that lead to degree and certificate completion.

    1.3. Build and promote equitable engagement and learning opportunities.

    A. Develop and provide a structured first-year experience program for new students.

    B. Strengthen connections, collaboration, and alignment between instruction and student services.

    C. Improve student learning and address gaps identified through assessments and surveys in pedagogy and services.

    D. Link instructional and student service programs to community needs and issues.

    1.4. Increase and promote equitable access.

    A. Improve accessibility and navigation of the College with student input.

    B. Improve access to Student Services at all LMC sites – Pittsburg, Brentwood, Academies, and online.

    C. Increase awareness about LMC’s services by all College personnel.

  • Goal #1 Evidence of Progress

    View evidences

  • Lesson Learned from EMP  2006-2016 Evaluation Report

    Goal #1: Improve the Learning of Students

    The assessment process is used to demonstrate that students are learning, and to improve teaching and course design if there are challenges. The College has a well-known and clear process (the five year cycle) for how to complete assessment, tie it to Program Review, and update the Course Outline of Records (COORs). This process includes, the collaboration amongst department chairs and their deans to place their courses in to four (4) cohorts (year 1, year 2, year 3 and year 4). The placement of the courses in these cohorts for the duration of the five year cycle helps faculty in planning the completion of their course-level assessments. During the fifth year of the five year cycle, every program must complete and submit their program-level assessment report in conjunction with their Comprehensive Program Review. The Teaching & Learning Committee (TLC) was developed to lead the College in adopting this process. The TLC leadership, especially the CSLO/PSLO Coordinator, assists faculty and departments on how to write student learning outcomes (SLOs), how to design meaningful assessment, and how to implement their assessment through coaching and professional development activities. Additionally, TLC compiles reports for dissemination and continuously seeks input on the process to best meet the needs of the College. As a result of the aforementioned assessment process and the formation of TLC, assessment cycles zero, one and a portion of two were completed within the designated ten year timeframe. As evidenced in the Aspen narrative by the implementation of strategies on improving developmental education and the assessment process at the course and program level. (Evidence - TLC Assessment Documents &R Resources webpage, TLC Midterm Report 2016, 2017 Annual ACCJC Report; 2013 ACCJC Annual Report, Aspen Narrative Section 5, question #6, 4CD Educational Plan Annual Report 2016)

    The General Education (GE) Committee and STEM have conducted focused groups and student interviews aimed at improving student learning. LMC provides a plethora of support for student learning including Math Labs, the MESA Center, the Honors Center and the Center for Academic Support which houses the Reading & Writing Center and tutoring services. (Evidence – General Education Committee Resources webpage, Math Lab webpage, MESA Center webpage, Honors Center webpage, Center for Academic Support webpage)

    The process of assessment to ensure student learning is strong overall at LMC. The participation rate in assessment is high, and the insights are used by many units to help guide change and improve COORs, course offerings and design. However, we have faced some challenges such as

    a near-universally derided software tool for assessment and program review; a need to more effectively “close the loop” on assessment throughout the College not just in individual programs/units; development and implementation of a research model to determine the effectiveness of the various modes of instruction (lab hours, online courses, distance learning, etc.); and to identify a method to bring data together from across disciplines and share the best practices of effective student learning.

    Overall through this process we have identified the gaps in meeting this goal. As a result, the following areas for improvement for Goal #1 are:

    • A new software tool is needed for assessment tracking and program review (Note - the College and District have begun the process required to purchase a new enterprise technology tool).
    • Increase professional development on assessment and improving classroom methods using SLOs and assessment insights to more uniformly and formally “close the loop” on assessment. These trainings should also include how to effectively utilize the insights learned to meaningfully change courses and programs (Note - TLC will be looking at possibly holding a Focused FLEX or may be Monday meetings on new and best practices in the classroom).
    • The connection between SLOs and classroom instruction and course design can be a little nebulous in some courses and programs. Many do very well at this, but some still see SLOs as not something to guide the design (Note - TLC is looking at developing a teacher training model and increasing professional development opportunities for training).

     

    Goal #2: Create an Educational Environment in Which All People have a Chance to Fully Develop Their Potential and Achieve Their Educational Goals

    Over the past four to five years LMC has worked to increase its success rates.  We implemented the Student Equity Plan, the Student Success & Support Program (3SP) Plan, the Basic Skills Initiative (BSI) Plan and we received HSI Grant funding. These plans provided additional funding to the College for more counselors, faculty, staff, services and professional development so we may better assist our students in reaching their full potential and achievement of their educational goals. For example, we increased the number of full-time counselors from seven to sixteen, with special emphasis on targeted counseling for particular student populations. Additionally, the school opened a Student Food Pantry, implemented Starfish (an early alert and retention program) and the District instituted a partnership with JFK University to offer a Student Wellness Program. We have also hired two (2) Equity Professional Learning Facilitators who have formed an Equity Core Team, devised an Equity Speaker Series and implemented the Faculty Advising and Mentoring (FAM) Program. The HSI Grant was instrumental in helping to create a culture of transfer (i.e. Transfer Center, Transfer Day, Transfer Academy, etc.). Additionally, LMC offers several learning communities such as Umoja, STEM, MESA, Honors, etc.  (Evidence – Transfer Services webpage, Transfer Academy webpage, Equity & Inclusion webpage; 3SP webpage, Student Equity Plan webpage, Equity Events webpage)

    While this work is ongoing, through this process we were able to identify some minor progression towards meeting this goal.

    Course Success Rates – We have increased the overall college course success rates and slightly improved the achievement gap for our African-American students. In fall 2014, the overall college course success rates were 71% and in fall 2016, we saw an increase to 73%.  The Student Equity Plan data indicated that the course success rates for our African-American students remains at a gap of -10% however, in 2016-2017 we experienced an improvement of 1% (over the -11% gap noted in 2014-2015). In comparison to the overall average rate for all groups, our Hispanic students are at a gap of -1% and our foster youth students, are at a gap of -18%. 

    Completion Rates – We have increased the number of transfers, degrees and certificates awarded. In 2012-2013 we awarded 705 AA/AS degrees, 678 certificates, and had 381 in-state transfers. In 2015-2016, we awarded 1,219 AA/AS degrees, 954 certificates and had 512 in- state transfers.  The Student Equity Plan data indicates that our African-American students in 2016-2017 transferred at a rate of 7% higher than the overall rate, while in 2014-2015, they transferred at a rate of -5%. African-American students at LMC have also increased their degree and certificate completion rates to a positive 8% in 2016-2017, compared to a - 6% rate in 2014-2015.

    Persistence Rates – We have improved upon our persistence rates for all students with long term educational goals. The LMC Scorecard data indicates a persistence rate of 65.9 percent overall for a cohort beginning in 2010-2011 with outcomes in 2015-2016. We do not yet have cohort data for a comparison group. (Evidence – Student Equity Plan, Strategic Plan 2014-19 Process-Retreats, Integrated Plan #1, Integrated Plan #10, CCCCD Fingertip Facts 2016-17, IEPI Goals).

    The new CCCCD EEO Plan 2016-2019 outlines current policies, procedures and practices with regards to hiring, with the intention of “ ensuring equal employment opportunity and creating a working and academic environment, which is welcoming to all, will foster diversity and promote excellence”.  The data from the fall 2015 semester indicated that the diversity of our employee does not, in general, mirror the diversity of our surrounding community or student body. LMC also revitalized the College EEO Committee with representation on the District EEO Advisory Council. Within the past few years, we have implemented mandated diversity training(s) for any individual serving on a hiring committee. 

    LMC has worked in providing an educational environment in which all people have a chance to fully develop their potential and achieve their educational goals. We will continue to explore new methods, strategies and initiatives to improve student learning, retention and success. The biggest challenge identified through this process for goal number two, was the hiring of faculty and staff that mirrors our community demographics. Engagement in a discussion establishing a “Culture of Change, Thinking and Values” may assist the College in beginning to overcome this challenge.

    Overall through this process we have identified the gaps in meeting this goal. As a result, the following areas for improvement for Goal #2 are:

    • Recruit a more diverse faculty by marketing multicultural events to increase campus visibility.
    • Improvement upon methods to stay connected with our alumni.
    • Improve support and resources for our Foster Youth students.

     

    Goal #3: Offer High Quality Programs That Meet the Needs of Students and the Community

    LMC has undergone many renovations over the past ten years, including the major demolition of the old administration building and addition of a “one-stop” student services building. In spring 2015, the new Student Services Center opened. This new building offered a central location for students to locate and access many services such as: Admissions and Records, Assessment Center, Career & Transfer Services, Cashier, Counseling, Disabled Students Programs & Services, Extended Opportunity Program & Services, Cooperative Agencies Resources for Education (CARE), CalWorks, Financial Aid, Employment Services, Scholarships, Welcome Center, Welcome Desk (formerly Information Desk) and more. In addition the Office of Instruction, the President’s Office, the Student Services’ Deans and Instructional Deans have also moved to the fourth floor of the building.   Construction began in fall 2017 on the new Student Union Building and Physical Education Complex and is expected to be completed in August 2019. The Student Union Building will house Student Life, the Bookstore, a Conference Center, Food Services, Shared Social Spaces, learning/studying areas, meeting spaces/conference rooms and offices. (Evidence – New Student Services Center Opening, Construction webpage, Opening Day Fall 2015-Facilities & Capital Projects Update)

    The Planning Committee developed a Core Strategic Planning Team to develop the outline, process preparation, planning and composition of LMC’s new Strategic Plan 2014-2019. Following Spring Opening Day dialogues, we wanted to ensure that we obtained college and community wide input and accurately identified the vision, values, goals and concepts of LMC and our Strategic Plan. Three separate retreats were organized to best capture the input from our community, staff/faculty and students. As a result, we obtained some outstanding input on our previous strategic goals, what distinguishes LMC, where we see LMC in five to ten years and what we value as a community and an institution. These retreats operated very similar to a focus group and due to these retreats the Core Planning Team was able to compose a new Strategic Plan that more accurately reflect who LMC is as an educational institution and where we want to be. Since then, similar retreats or focus groups have been organized and utilized as a method for gathering input and information. (Evidence – Strategic Planning Process-Retreats webpage)

    LMC over the past several years has greatly expanded its opportunities for professional development for both faculty and staff. The development of the Professional Development Advisory Committee (PDAC) and Nexus for both new full-time faculty and new full-time Classified has helped acclimate new employees to LMC and the District. In 2016-2017 we had approximately 200 professional development activities (including Flex and other workshops). PDAC also offers mini-grants to support professional learning opportunities that are organically designed and created by staff and faculty such as online access to Drama Masterclasses and support of the Comic Event – Queer Comedy Showcase (LGBTQ) in fall 2017. In addition to Focused Flex and Flex Week every semester, there are now a number of Flex opportunities offered throughout the semester. The Office of Equity & Inclusion (formerly the Office of College Advancement) and the Professional Development Advisory Committee (PDAC), have worked towards increasing the number of professional development and learning opportunities every semester. This includes free access to Lynda.com, @ONE, the formation of the Health & Wellness Committee and the development of the Professional Learning Center in the Library. In addition, a new position was developed to support LMC faculty and staff using technology tools to enhance learning in traditional and online/hybrid courses by providing convenient drop-in technology support and hands-on workshops. The Technology Training & Development Coordinator provides one-on-one Canvas trainings, SMART classroom training, small group workshops, professional development activities, technology orientations, and much more. (Evidence - Flex webpage, PDAC webpage, CCCCO Professional Learning Network, @ONE website, Lynda.com website, Professional Learning Center webpage, Technology Training & Development Coordinator, professional development offerings, participation comparison by employee groups)

    The Student Equity Plan has provided funding for equity focused professional development. This funding allows for faculty and staff to apply for additional monies to fund professional development activities such as workshops, conferences and Flex activities focused on equity. Additionally, this funding has allotted for two (2) Equity Professional Learning Facilitators and Equity Core Team Leadership Training. (Evidence –Equity focused professional development)

    Additional state funding and new categorical funds (i.e. 3SP, Student Equity, BSI, etc.) have allowed LMC to increase the hiring of faculty, staff and management positions including the hiring of lab assistants at both the Pittsburg and Brentwood campuses. We have also increased the number of permanent counselors and new full-time faculty hired.  The additional funding and subsequent hiring increases have given us the wisdom in how we utilize categorical funds by assessing and re-assessing our strengths and weaknesses. (Evidence –SSSP, Student Equity Plan, BSI)

    We have increased the number of Associate Degree for Transfers to over 21 (per the 2017-2018 Catalog) and renovated General Education. LMC now offers a Social Justice Degree and we have expanded our learning communities (MESA, Umoja, Transfer Academy). The assessment process for students was revamped and we now offer an accelerated course for Math (Math-029) and for English (Engl-095). The ETEC and PTEC programs were strengthened approximately 10 years ago and continue to grow and expand with additional course offerings and advanced learning/training. The development of the ACS-10 course (Becoming a College Scholar: A First-Year Seminar) has also better prepared and equipped first-time and returning community college students for college life. (Evidence – LMC Awards 2011-2016, LMC Catalog of Classes webpage, GE Committee webpage, MESA webpage, Umoja webpage, Transfer Academy webpage, Mathematics webpage, English webpage, ETEC webpage, PTEC webpage, ACS-010 Informational Career Fair Flyer)

    As an institution we have become better at utilizing data to help drive our decisions then we were ten years ago. LMC has worked with local high school districts (AUSD, LUHSD and PUSD) in our service area to offer dual enrollment for high school students. This will better prepare and benefit high school students for college. (Evidence – High School Students webpage)

    Several challenges were identified by the campus community related to hiring, technology, and changing/competing State priorities.   Making more positive movement toward the goal of a higher full-time to part-time faculty ratio was expressed as an important need.  While we have increased the number of permanent employees (fall 2012 we had 103 full time faculty and in spring 2018 we increased to 118 full time faculty), we can always increase further by pledging to meet the AB1725 mandate of 75% full-time faculty. In addition, instructional technology enhancements and professional development were noted as significant challenges along with the duration of time it takes to develop curriculum and programs that respond to changing community/industry needs.

    Overall through this process we have identified the gaps in meeting this goal. As a result, the following areas for improvement for Goal #3 are:

    • Hire more full-time faculty
    • Increase opportunities for professional development, particularly for managers and classified professionals
    • Include more student input into curriculum development
    • Data needs should be met on a more timely basis

 Provide Your Feedback     View Feedback

Provide Your Feedback    View Feedback
  • Goal #3  Promote innovation, expand organizational capacity, and enhance institutional effectiveness
     
    Objectives Strategies
    3.1. Encourage and support innovation.

    A. Create opportunities for the campus community to explore and institutionalize innovative, sustainable curricula, services, practices, and technologies.

    B. Develop a mechanism for College personnel to share innovative practices and resulting successes with the campus community.

    3.2. Attract, retain, and invest in talented employees.  

    A. Develop systems and protocols to strengthen the diversity of employee hiring pools that represent community demographics.

    B. Cultivate a culture of ongoing professional development.

    3.3. Increase the effectiveness of the institution.  

    A. Align planning, governance, and operations through clear processes, guidelines, and communication.

    B. Improve use and understanding of data.

  • Goal #3 Evidence of Progress

    Program Review Report:

    ·      EMP 3 2014-15

    ·      EMP 3 2015-16

    ·      EMP 3 2016-17

    Program Review 2016-17

    Comprehensive Program Review 2017-18

    College Plan Report:

    ·      Student Equity Plan

    ·      3SP Plan

    ·      Basic Skills Plan

    Accreditation Report

    Strategic Plan 2014-19 process--Retreats

    3.2.1  TLC Position Paper

    3.3.1  Data & Surveys

    3.3.2  Strategic Plan 2014-19 Retreats

    3.3.3  CCCCD External Scan 2013

    3.3.4  Workforce development?

    Program Review Report:

    ·      EMP 5 2014-15

    ·      EMP 5 2015-16

    ·      EMP 5 2016-17

    College Plan Report:

    ·      Student Equity Plan

    ·      3SP Plan

    ·      Basic Skills Plan

    Accreditation Report

    Strategic Plan 2014-19 process--Retreats

    5.2.1  Professional Development Learning Center

    5.2.2  Canvas

    -------

    Program Review Report:

    ·      EMP 6 2014-15

    ·      EMP 6 2015-16

    ·      EMP 6 2016-17

    College Plan Report:

    ·      Student Equity Plan

    ·      3SP Plan

    ·      Basic Skills Plan

    Accreditation Report

    Strategic Plan 2014-19 process--Retreats

    3.4.1  List from Mary # of flex

    3.4.2  LPG

    3.4.3  PDAC

    3.4.4  Nexus?

    3.4.5  Student Equity funded positions

    3.4.6  Dean of Equity and Inclusion position

  • Lesson Learned from EMP  2006-2016 Evaluation Report

    Goal #2: Create an Educational Environment in Which All People have a Chance to Fully Develop Their Potential and Achieve Their Educational Goals

    Over the past four to five years LMC has worked to increase its success rates.  We implemented the Student Equity Plan, the Student Success & Support Program (3SP) Plan, the Basic Skills Initiative (BSI) Plan and we received HSI Grant funding. These plans provided additional funding to the College for more counselors, faculty, staff, services and professional development so we may better assist our students in reaching their full potential and achievement of their educational goals. For example, we increased the number of full-time counselors from seven to sixteen, with special emphasis on targeted counseling for particular student populations. Additionally, the school opened a Student Food Pantry, implemented Starfish (an early alert and retention program) and the District instituted a partnership with JFK University to offer a Student Wellness Program. We have also hired two (2) Equity Professional Learning Facilitators who have formed an Equity Core Team, devised an Equity Speaker Series and implemented the Faculty Advising and Mentoring (FAM) Program. The HSI Grant was instrumental in helping to create a culture of transfer (i.e. Transfer Center, Transfer Day, Transfer Academy, etc.). Additionally, LMC offers several learning communities such as Umoja, STEM, MESA, Honors, etc.  (Evidence – Transfer Services webpage, Transfer Academy webpage, Equity & Inclusion webpage; 3SP webpage, Student Equity Plan webpage, Equity Events webpage)

    While this work is ongoing, through this process we were able to identify some minor progression towards meeting this goal.

    Course Success Rates – We have increased the overall college course success rates and slightly improved the achievement gap for our African-American students. In fall 2014, the overall college course success rates were 71% and in fall 2016, we saw an increase to 73%.  The Student Equity Plan data indicated that the course success rates for our African-American students remains at a gap of -10% however, in 2016-2017 we experienced an improvement of 1% (over the -11% gap noted in 2014-2015). In comparison to the overall average rate for all groups, our Hispanic students are at a gap of -1% and our foster youth students, are at a gap of -18%. 

    Completion Rates – We have increased the number of transfers, degrees and certificates awarded. In 2012-2013 we awarded 705 AA/AS degrees, 678 certificates, and had 381 in-state transfers. In 2015-2016, we awarded 1,219 AA/AS degrees, 954 certificates and had 512 in- state transfers.  The Student Equity Plan data indicates that our African-American students in 2016-2017 transferred at a rate of 7% higher than the overall rate, while in 2014-2015, they transferred at a rate of -5%. African-American students at LMC have also increased their degree and certificate completion rates to a positive 8% in 2016-2017, compared to a - 6% rate in 2014-2015.

    Persistence Rates – We have improved upon our persistence rates for all students with long term educational goals. The LMC Scorecard data indicates a persistence rate of 65.9 percent overall for a cohort beginning in 2010-2011 with outcomes in 2015-2016. We do not yet have cohort data for a comparison group. (Evidence – Student Equity Plan, Strategic Plan 2014-19 Process-Retreats, Integrated Plan #1, Integrated Plan #10, CCCCD Fingertip Facts 2016-17, IEPI Goals).

    The new CCCCD EEO Plan 2016-2019 outlines current policies, procedures and practices with regards to hiring, with the intention of “ ensuring equal employment opportunity and creating a working and academic environment, which is welcoming to all, will foster diversity and promote excellence”.  The data from the fall 2015 semester indicated that the diversity of our employee does not, in general, mirror the diversity of our surrounding community or student body. LMC also revitalized the College EEO Committee with representation on the District EEO Advisory Council. Within the past few years, we have implemented mandated diversity training(s) for any individual serving on a hiring committee. 

    LMC has worked in providing an educational environment in which all people have a chance to fully develop their potential and achieve their educational goals. We will continue to explore new methods, strategies and initiatives to improve student learning, retention and success. The biggest challenge identified through this process for goal number two, was the hiring of faculty and staff that mirrors our community demographics. Engagement in a discussion establishing a “Culture of Change, Thinking and Values” may assist the College in beginning to overcome this challenge.

    Overall through this process we have identified the gaps in meeting this goal. As a result, the following areas for improvement for Goal #2 are:

    • Recruit a more diverse faculty by marketing multicultural events to increase campus visibility.
    • Improvement upon methods to stay connected with our alumni.
    • Improve support and resources for our Foster Youth students.

     

    Goal #5: Enhance a Culture of Innovation, Inclusiveness, and Collaboration

    During the fall 2015 Opening Day Ceremony, President Dr. Bob Kratochvil, reiterated his commitment to achieving institutional equity for all students.  In spring 2016 the Office of Equity and Inclusion was created. The Los Medanos College Office of Equity and Inclusion is committed to achieving equitable success for all students, providing a diverse and equitable academic and cultural environment for all members of the Los Medanos campus community and institutionalizing equity throughout the College. Through the design and implementation of a campus-wide equity plan (that goes beyond the state driven Student Equity Plan), the Office of Equity and Inclusion provides leadership for equity-based decisions, practices, and policies. Our goal is “Equitable student success through culturally relevant educational opportunities, pedagogies and practices across the institution, as well as intentional employee recruitment, inclusion and an on-going commitment to equity-based professional development.” (Evidence – Office of Equity & Inclusion webpage link, Student Equity Plan webpage, Equity in Action webpage)

    Los Medanos College was the only California College selected as a finalist in a prestigious program designed to recognize innovation and promising practices among two-year colleges nationwide. The Awards of Excellence are sponsored by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) and recognized Mathematics Professor Myra Snell (in the Faculty Innovation Category) for her solution to streamline learning and improve success rates for community college students in their studies of mathematics, with Path2Stats. In January 2015, the District held the “Convocation on Innovation”, an all-District Flex event at the Hilton in Concord. This event helped to usher in an era of nurturing, collaboration and support of innovation. As a follow-up to the convocation, in May 2015 LMC launched the very successful “Idea to Innovation: Bringing Creative Concepts to Life” award series to fund new projects never before implemented at LMC. Proposals were submitted and reviewed by an innovations selections team (consisting of the President’s Cabinet and the three Senate Presidents). The four proposals selected were – a technology-enhanced strategy for student success (primarily designed for ESL students), TEDx Talks, a performance and collaborative project of “Ruined” and a speaker event titled “Speaking of Education: What We Really Want To Know”.  In fall 2016, LMC held a speaker series titled “An Evening of Cultural Conversations” in which five (5) LMC students shared their unique cultural journeys of perseverance and success.

    (Evidence – Awards of Excellence, Myra Snell webpage link, An Evening of Cultural Conversations webpage link, Innovation Awards Call for Proposals, Opening Day Fall 2015 – Innovation Awards) 

    We have a large number of local initiative happening in individual programs that are highly innovative and collaborative. For example, the LMC Debate Team holds public debates at Pittsburg City Hall as an innovative way to include and engage the community, students, faculty and staff. LMC also hosted its first Intramural Debate Tournament and a negotiations tournament for Speech students. Interdisciplinary collaborations occur quite often but are seldom acknowledged, such as a Humanities faculty member and a Drama faculty member collaborating to teach Shakespeare Kings and the Library Director and the Journalism Department Chair collaborating to teach an applied ethics course on Information Ethics.

    (Evidence – Debate Team News & Events webpage, Honors Humanities 24 Fall 2010 Course Description, Honors Philosophy 2 Ethics of Information spring 2014 Course Description) 

    The training of Math tutors with faculty, Math teaching communities and the “pair share” has helped bring together faculty, staff and students. Accelerated curriculum within specific departments such as Math and English geared towards increasing degree completion and transfer rates is an example of collaborating within and outside of departments to provide our students with the opportunity to succeed. Additionally, disciplines such as English, History and Anthropology have increased their curriculum to include diaspora focused learning and knowledge. We have focused on social justice curriculum, activities, advocacy and exhibits on campus to help enhance student identity, awareness and access. Collaborative activities between learning communities and the Counseling department are ensuring student support and success services are indeed supporting our students to success. There are a number of successful collaborative activities and efforts occurring not just within LMC but also outside LMC, with our community. For example, Career Education apprenticeship and internship programs with industry partners, contract education, bridge projects between adult education and community college, faculty advising and mentoring and the annual Mass Casualty Incident Event between Nursing, EMS and Police Services.

    (Evidence – Math Lab webpage, Math Acceleration webpage, Developmental Education-English webpage, LMC Associate in Arts in Social Justice: LGBTQ Studies for Transfer, Equity Events webpage, Workforce Development webpage, Mass Casualty Incident 2016 video)

    New funding from statewide initiatives such as SSSP, Student Equity and BSI have given way to additional collaborations in student services, increased staffing in student services support collaborations and enhanced existing student support services. For example, the implementation of the Starfish Early Alert system was a result of collaborations between instruction and student services. A partnership between Counseling and Distance Education has included an e-advising system for students to receive counseling services online. The implementation of two (2) new innovative systems for employee timecard entry (Web-Time Entry) and employee absence reporting and tracking Employee Absence Reporting system (EARL). In spring 2016 LMC became the first community college in Contra Costa County to open a center for Veterans to receive resources and support. In addition to those listed above, there are many more collaborative and innovative projects that have taken place over the past ten years and we anticipate many more to come in the future. (Evidence – Starfish webpage, E-Advising webpage, Veterans Center Opening-LMC in the News webpage)

    Every semester a Focused Flex activity is held before the semester begins, which provides an opportunity for the College to collaborate on a designated initiative, issue and/or an identified need for the campus. College Assemblies are typically held every other Monday during the semester and offer another venue to promote collaboration. PDAC and the Equity Plan both offer Mini-grants to provide opportunities for collaborative, creative, and innovative approaches to improve teaching and learning, leadership, and student-focused initiatives. Additional professional development activities include the Classified Employees Enhancement Program (CEEP), tuition reimbursement for staff and Nexus for newly hired faculty and staff (a training program that promotes interdepartmental collaboration and connection). (Evidence – Focused Flex fall 2016 flyer, SGC webpage-College Assembly Presentations, CCCCD Educational Reimbursements webpage, Professional Learning webpage)

    While collaboration and innovation occurs internally, there are also some collaborative activities that occur between LMC and our external community such as: the Zero Textbook Initiative, the 4CD Teaching, the Latina Leadership (LLN) Conference and the State Journalism Conference were both held at LMC, the annual César Chávez Awards, and the annual Gospel Celebration hosted by our Music Department. Additionally, a collaboration between LMC/Pittsburg High/Stanford/San José State/Hispanic Chamber resulted in 400 students invited by LMC and the Hispanic Chamber of Conference to learn more about STEM opportunities and College access in spring 2016. (Evidence – SU18 Schedule of Classes-Page 7, CCCCD Teaching Academy Spring 2013, 28th Annual LLN Conference March 2015, Cesar Chavez Events webpage, Annual Gospel Celebration, STEM webpage) 

    Based on many activities and projects acknowledged in plans as well as general feedback, the College has been supporting and enhancing innovation, inclusiveness and collaboration. However, some challenges were identified. While LMC has a lot of amazing collaborative activities and projects, most are happening in “pockets” with the challenge becoming synthesizing them in to a program inventory and communicating the results of these efforts to the College. There should be more College awareness, recognition and embracement of collaborative and innovative activities. It may be helpful to develop a clear and concise organization of plans and processes in order to coordinate innovation projects, especially those involving outside entities, and a clearer delineation of managerial responsibilities for administering grants. It has also been a challenge to motivate faculty and staff to participate regularly in collaborative opportunities such as Focused Flex and College Assemblies. It was noted through this process a need for more support of smaller departments on campus. Smaller departments have experienced a lack of time, funding, space and staff making it difficult sometimes to participate in collaborative activities.

    While faculty and staff participation in college-wide collaborative activities has been a challenge, it was noted the need to offer more informed meetings surrounding College changes that include multiple departments, administrators, faculty, and staff that are geared towards creating an environment of inclusivity while educating our College on issues that are relevant to our students. It is important to provide environments and learning opportunities for continued conversations and growth surrounding cultural competencies, biases, and “isms”. 

    It has been challenging to identify a method of synthesizing best practices across departments. Most programs are not aware of what other programs are doing campus-wide awareness and knowledge of individual department’s best practices and activities would result in more interdepartmental collaboration and innovation. It may be helpful to not only document activities that involve a specific funding source but to develop a standard practice for all programs/units to document their activities for future reporting purposes. Measuring outcomes, achieving and identifying learning objectives, tracking outcomes and future applications, and finding the time to reflect on all of the above have proven to be significant challenges for faculty.

    While program review is required it is also an important and necessary tool for goal development and departmental growth. However, a challenge within program review is the variance of goals and the lack of completion or major progress towards some of the goals.

    District-wide we need to increase cross-college projects (DVC, CCC and LMC) as we are missing an opportunity to provide ease of access to students across campuses because a lack of collaboration to match District course numbers with CI-D numbers. Additionally, we need to design a better method to support, encourage and provide resources for our students to embrace a culture of innovation and collaboration.

    Overall through this process we have identified the gaps in meeting this goal. As a result, the following areas for improvement for Goal #5 are:

    • Develop a better method of tracking student success (i.e. data driven online classes)
    • Develop a consistent method for tracking and sharing collaborative and innovative projects and their outcomes to increase College awareness
    • Increase support and resources for smaller departments to encourage more creativity, collaboration and innovation
    • Increase engagement and participation of faculty and staff in flex activities and college-wide activities
    • Offer more opportunities and resources to support student innovation and collaboration
    • Organizationally, we might benefit by creating more structure to increase engagement in innovative practices and collaborative activities. Currently, there is no single institutional priority.  For example:
    • Define institutional priorities or themes for a given period of time (i.e. in 2019-2020, all programs and departments will have a plan to support/address equity and inclusion as the college theme.)
    • All departments/programs will contribute by defining learning objectives, a timeline for implementation, an action plan (supporting activities) and how outcomes will be measured. This can be defined in program review, assessment projects and as collaborative efforts/partnerships defining learning objectives, a timeline for implementation, an action plan (supporting activities) and how outcomes will be measured.
    • By developing a set of expectations for all departments/programs on campus to support the single campus priority, there is less opportunity to “opt-out” of participation.

     

     

    Goal #6: Establish a Culture of Research and Planning, Implementing, Assessing and Improving

    During the 2013-2014 academic year, the District Office centralized research and planning at the District Office with the hiring of a Senior Dean of Research & Planning, Director of Research & Collaboration and Research Analysts. LMC hired a Senior Dean of Planning & Institutional Effectiveness to chair the Planning Committee and lead the Office of Planning & Institutional Effectiveness (PIE). The mission of the Office of PIE, is to provide effective leadership to manage college-wide planning efforts, to promote student learning and success, to establish a culture of evaluation of institutional effectiveness, and to coordinate data-gathering leading to continuous improvement towards achieving the mission and goals of the College and District. This office will collaboratively lead efforts in the development of strategic plans and/or educational master plans, program review, accreditation, and the promotion of student learning and achievement. Additionally, this office facilitates the research needs of programs and units at LMC with the District Research Office. (Evidence – District Research & Planning Office webpage)

    In 2012-2013, a new software system for program review updates, uploading assessments, professional development reporting and entry of program/unit successes was implemented. The Program Review Submission Tool (PRST) has been a centralized system in which programs/units can develop objectives for the upcoming year, report on previous objectives, align their objectives with College and/or District strategic plan goals and upload their CSLO and PSLO assessments. One particular advantage of the tool is the ability for programs and units to record their efforts within it. This makes the ability to globally look at the work being done institutionally, very user friendly. However, due to several factors LMC along with DVC, CCC and the District Office have begun the process for purchase and implementation of a new enterprise technology tool. (Evidence – Program Review webpage)

    LMC has always had a culture of inquiry which has resulted in individual programs and units asking important questions and looking at research and data even more when assessing student learning and success. In an effort to address the needs of the College in a centralized location, the Office of PIE greatly enhanced their webpages to include college plans, data and surveys including the tableau system, accreditation, institutional effectiveness and program review. The expansion of these webpages and inclusion of information offers a centralized method for the public and College to access and view a multitude of information related to data, research, planning and institutional effectiveness. (Evidence – Planning & Institutional Effectiveness webpage)

    From early 2013 to present day, the Office of PIE and the College developed a new Strategic Plan, established Institution-Set Standards, developed IEPI Goals, re-affirmed ACCJC accreditation through an Institutional Self-Evaluation Report and a Follow-Up Report, lead the process for annual updates to Program Review and Comprehensive Program Review, administered the CCSSE and SENSE surveys and collaborated with the District Research & Planning Office on college data and research needs. (Evidence – Strategic Plan 2014-2019:An EMP for LMC, Institution Set-Standards webpage, IEPI 2015-2016 Goals, LMC Self Evaluation Report to ACCJC 2014, LMC Follow-Up Report to ACCJC 2015, Comprehensive Program Review Data Packet webpage, Data and Surveys webpage, Request Research webpage, tableau webpage)

    Through this process it was noted that it has been twelve years since the Educational Master Plan 2006-2016 was implemented and some of the objectives and strategies seem still valid. This may be due, in part, to an unclear alignment or connection between program review activities and objectives with the EMP goals. Program Review activities are not related to the outlined strategies within the EMP goals making it difficult to discern if the activity is truly related to the goal. In addition, the quality and focus of program review updates vary significantly between programs/units. There also seems to be an overall lack of shared understanding of the goals and no direct link to the outlined strategies. (Evidence – EMP 6 2015-2016, EMP 6 2016-2017)

    While LMC has made many strides in college-wide planning and institutional effectiveness, the centralization of research and data at the District Office has created some difficulties for many faculty and staff in fulfilling our research and data needs. This has led to a larger challenge, in that we need to ensure as a College we are asking the right questions in order to ensure we are receiving the right information. The College has also been challenged in ensuring accurate interpretation and understanding of the research/data once it is received. Additionally, in 2015 the Senior Dean of Planning & Institutional Effectiveness departed LMC leaving the position unfilled for approximately two (2) years until the next Senior Dean of P&IE was hired in summer 2017. This vacancy left the College to endure a few challenges in proceeding with College planning efforts and processes.

    Overall through this process we have identified the gaps in meeting this goal. As a result, the following areas for improvement for Goal #6 are:

    • Ensure the incorporation of the student voice in program review, planning and research processes
    • Increase institution-wide training on research and data
    • Enhance training on program review specifically in the process and alignment with goals

 Provide Your Feedback    View Feedback

  • Goal #4 Invest in technology, fortify infrastructure, and enhance fiscal resources
     
    Objectives Strategies
    4.1. Provide sustainable, state-of-the-art technology.

    A. Provide college-wide technology and related services that meet the needs of students and College personnel.

    B. Implement the Technology Plan to continuously update the College’s hardware, software, and network to improve the effectiveness of instruction, student services, and administrative services.

    C. Provide faculty and students with accessible and effective technological infrastructure and support for online instruction and student services.

    4.2. Improve and enhance the physical plant.  

    A. Exercise sound judgment in the use of physical resources.

    B. Promote sustainable practices in construction, land use, utilities, materials, and recycling.

    C. Provide safe and comfortable facilities and environment for teaching, learning, and working.

    4.3. Improve and enhance resource sustainability and fiscal responsibility.  

    A. Expand fiscal resources through grants and external funding sources to achieve Strategic Directions.

    B. Exercise sound judgment in the use of fiscal resources.

  • Goal #4 Evidence of Progress

    Program Review Report:

    ·      EMP 4 2014-15

    ·      EMP 4 2015-16

    ·      EMP 4 2016-17

    Program Review 2016-17

    Comprehensive Program Review 2017-18

    College Plan Report:

    ·      Student Equity Plan

    ·      3SP Plan

    ·      Basic Skills Plan

    Accreditation Report

    Strategic Plan 2014-19 process--Retreats

    4.2.1  Kevin

    4.2.2  CCCCD External scan 2013

    4.2.3  Rubric to decide the offering vs cancelation

    4.3.2  ACCJC Annual Fiscal Report March 2017

  • Lesson Learned from EMP  2006-2016 Evaluation Report

    Goal #4: Ensure the Fiscal Well-Being of the College

    As most community colleges in the United States, LMC has fiscally fluctuated over the past ten years due to changes in the economy on a local, state and national level. Due to these changes in the economy we have experienced increases and slight decreases in student enrollment, we have had to suspend our resource allocation process for one year and even had to furlough some classified employees. However, LMC has persevered and in conjunction with the District has remained fiscally sound even when faced with economic uncertainty.

    LMC has increased its FTEs from 3,491 in fall 2012 to 3,530 in fall 2016 and the unduplicated student head count from 8,556 (fall 2012) to 8,688 (fall 2016). Additionally, as a result of the Brentwood Center expansion we experienced an enormous increase in the FTES at Brentwood. Additional space was purchased at the existing Brentwood Center location and then converted to build larger classrooms, increase the total number of classrooms and construct the new science lab. (Evidence – ACCJC Follow-Up Report 2015-Page 11, 2012 LMC Quick Facts, 2016 LMC Quick Facts)

    In 2010, the Marketing Department worked with the College and our industry partners to develop the Career Focus Magazine. This magazine is mailed out to all LMC “feeder” neighborhoods. In addition, electronic billboards, commercials and redesigned web pages have enhanced previous advertisements and marketed LMC to a much larger audience. In addition, LMC was recently named one of the top 150 public community colleges in the nation and ranked #6 on the list of the “College Choice Top 50 Best Community Colleges for 2016-2017. These accolades have helped to increase our marketing exposure to beyond our surrounding communities. The LMC Foundation Board meets regularly with community leaders, partners and donors. The LMCF also offers payroll and automatic PayPal deductions for donors to contribute to a variety of scholarships and programs.   (Evidence – Career Focus Magazine webpage link, LMC News & Publications webpage link, LMC Aspen Prize webpage link, LMC College Choice webpage link, LMC Foundation webpage link)

    We have strengthened our partnerships with local high schools to include dual enrollment (LMC classes are held on high school campuses). Additionally, due to grant funding we have started conversations between high school Math and English instructors and LMC faculty, to expand our existing partnerships to include early preparation for high school students in these subjects.  Career Fridays and Senior Saturdays, bring high school students to campus regularly. The Student Outreach program and Admissions & Records regularly visits local high schools to assist with applications, assessments and conduct orientations. Every summer we support the Summer Math Institute which brings middle school students to our campus to study Mathematics. Additionally, LG has partnered with our Appliance Repair Program and BART has partnered with LMC to offer the Transit Career Ladders Training program for current and prospective BART employees. Our fiscal well-being is also strengthened by the receipt of two (2) HSI Grants, and a three year BSI Transformation Grant, a Guided Pathways grant and funding from 3SP and Student Equity Plans. LMC has also received Strong Workforce grant funding to help expand and strengthen our CTE Programs. (Evidence – Dual Enrollment webpage link, Senior Saturday webpage link, Pre-Orientation Workshops for HS Seniors webpage link, LG Partnership with Appliance Repair, Workforce Development webpage link, EXITO-HSI Grant 2010-2015 PowerPoint Presentation, BSI 2014 Narrative Report, Meta-Majors & Guided Pathways, 3SP Plan 2015-16 , Student Equity Plan)

    Construction recently concluded on the second floor of the Pittsburg campus on expansion of classrooms to support larger class size sections and to reconfigure these rooms to become SMART classrooms. Nursing was moved and restructured in spring 2012 to include SMART classrooms, a simulation manikin (SimMan) and a skills lab that functions similar to a hospital ward. The outdated Athletic portable facilities have been demolished and construction has begun on a new Physical Education facility by fall of 2019. (Evidence – College Complex 2nd Floor Renovation, Nursing Programs webpage link, Physical Education Complex Construction webpage link)

    LMC has also expanded programs and services to support foster youth students and enhanced learning communities such as UMOJA and PUENTE which focus on recruiting and supporting underrepresented students. Multiple legislative measures have created more access for students, including AB 705 which requires community college districts to maximize the probability that a student will enter and complete transfer-level coursework in Math and English within a one-year timeframe by utilizing assessment measures that include high school performance to achieve this goal. (Evidence –Foster Youth webpage link, Learning Communities webpage link, CCCCO AB705 Summary)

    A few challenges were identified related to the absence of a grant writer at LMC, the maximum number of students enrolled in a course and the prioritization of registration for Veteran students. Due to the implementation of the compressed calendar in fall 2018, the addition of a January intercession and increased summer course offerings may help ensure all our students have ample opportunities to complete their classes in time to graduate. Priority registration is given to students in the CalWorks, DSP&S, EOP&S, Foster Youth and/or Veterans programs. Although, class size is still a discussion with the United Faculty, it can be addressed by including multiple online sections for “in-demand” courses. (Evidence – Grant Development & Services, Admissions & Records Registration Instructions webpage link, 2018-2019 CCCCD Academic Calendar)

    Overall through this process we have identified the gaps in meeting this goal. As a result, the following areas for improvement for Goal #4 are:

    • Increase the hiring of full-time faculty
    • Hire a grant writer for the College
    • Identify and/or change methods and processes to increase course availability and course enrollment limits
  Provide Your Feedback    View Feedback

 

Feedback links

 

Strategic Planning Process